My GenBrain Review (2020) – Why It’s A Scam

My GenBrain Review - Why It's A Scam

It’s time to review GenBrain – a nootropic product that has been quite popular lately.

But is it really worth the shot?

At first sight – it looks like a serious scam:

  • very few info on its composition
  • unknown producer
  • no real user opinions

So what’s the truth behind this supplement? Here’s my detailed analysis.

Note: This review is based on my opinion + research on GenBrain.

Review Summary

Full Name: GenBrain by Charles Mayer

Product Type: Cognitive Supplement

Best Actual Price: $49/bottle

Cheapest Place To Buy: Only available on its official website

Designed For: Brain boosting – according to its promises:

  • enhances mental clarity
  • boosts energy and memory
  • eliminates brain fog syndrome

It pretty much has the same benefits as all nootropics (that’s what it claims, at least).

My Rating: 2 out of 10Most likely a scam

Recommended?: Surely not – it has lots of major issues:

  • essential facts are hidden (ingredients, dosage, producer)
  • only fake user opinions
  • too pricey for its real value

I personally recommend an alternative that has the best quality/price from the market.

 

What I Liked About It

  • Pills have average size and they’re easy to swallow
  • Probably doesn’t cause any major side effect

 

What I Didn’t Like About It

  • Full ingredient list isn’t disclosed
  • No doses for any ingredient
  • No real user opinions anywhere
  • Too expensive for its real value
  • You can’t see the price unless you give out your personal details

 

 


GenBrain – A Quick Overview


Basically – GenBrain comes from “genius brain”.

However, that’s mostly how it claims to help – because in reality, that’s far from being the case:

  • its formula is (probably) not strong enough to help
  • it lacks many essential info about its background
  • there’s no opinion from previous customers

So at first sight, GenBrain doesn’t look good at all.

And if you dig deeper into it – things get even worse.

That’s because you can’t see its actual price range until you fill in your purchase info.

If you decide you don’t want the product afterwards – they automatically save your email.

You can guess what happens next:

  • you receive lots of reminders about your potential order
  • they might also send you some minor discounts
  • basically, they trick you into buying the product

As I said before – I surely don’t agree with this kind of strategy.

To me, it’s another sign there’s something not right about GenBrain.

So given all these facts, it’s surely not a product I would recommend any soon.

 


#1 – Claims & Producer


Here are some general things on this supplement:

  • how it works
  • what exactly it’s designed for
  • who is its producer
1. Claims

According to its official page, GenBrain is described to be a “revolutionary clinically proven smart pill”:

However – it doesn’t state any reasons for these claims:

  • doesn’t give out the references to the studies it mentions
  • its user opinions seem very fake

So I personally would not trust its claims, mostly for lack of evidence.

That’s why I doubt this supplement does with it promises to do.

2. Company Behind

GenBrain has a serious problem at this chapter.

There is no info about the actual brand behind it.

In fact – it’s one of the few supplements with this issue (as most give out lots of info on their producer):

  • company’s name isn’t even mentioned anywhere
  • there’s no producer on the label

All I could find out is that the formula was developed by a guy called Charles Mayer.

But other than that – there’s no info on him or any form of contact details.

So from this point of view, there’s clearly something wrong about this brand.

If it was legit – it would at least have the minimum contact info.

So I personally would not take the risk of buying from them.

 


#2 – Formula (3 out of 10)


This supplement has some major problems at this chapter:

  • full ingredient list is not disclosed
  • no doses for any ingredient
  • only basic info on its composition

In other words – you can’t really tell what’s inside this supplement.

Only a few of its ingredients are disclosed (but their doses are hidden).

Now – this usually happens when the formula is very weak and the ingredients have very low doses.

Otherwise, the full formula should be available for everyone interested.

That’s why GenBrain has high chances to be a scam (judging after that).

Now, let’s take a closer look at the ingredients that are disclosed:

1. Bacopa Monnieri

It’s one of the best herbs for cognitive health.

That’s the reason why it’s among the most common ingredients in nootropic supplements:

  • increases cognitive performance [1]
  • improves memory
  • it’s also effective against stress

But despite its benefits – we can’t really tell the exact dose from GenBrain.

So I personally doubt it’s a very high one.

2. Vinpocetine

This herb is less common in brain supplements – but it surely has its own benefits:

  • improves brain blood flow [2]
  • fights against brain cell damage

But compared to classic ingredients like Bacopa Monnieri, it’s surely not as helpful.

3. Ginkgo Biloba

This herb is very well known for its memory benefits:

  • increases focus and attention [3]
  • overcomes memory loss issues
  • prevents degenerative conditions

Also – it has some strong antioxidant proprieties, so it fights brain aging.

4. Acetyl L-Carnitine

If you’re familiar with nootropics, you surely heard about this ingredient before:

  • boosts brain health
  • improves memory and learning
  • prevents brain aging

However, once again – there’s no dose, so it’s hard to tell how much could this compound help here.


Conclusion

Overall – GenBrain’s formula is terrible simply because it lacks essential info:

  • only 4 ingredients disclosed
  • none of them has any dose listed out
  • no extra info on the composition

Just like I said, that’s probably because the formula is very weak and the doses are very low.

Otherwise, there’s nothing that could explain it.

So given these facts – I would surely not recommend GenBrain any soon.

There are many other products with far better ingredients (and doses).

 


#3 – Pills & Dosage (6 out of 10)


Here’s what you should know about GenBrain at this chapter.

1. The Pills

First of all, there are very few info on this product’s pills (just like in most of its features).

However, I did manage to find out a couple of things:

  • they are formulated as capsules
  • their dimensions are quite average
  • swallowing them shouldn’t be an issue

Basically – the pills themselves look quite common.

2. The Dosage

Once again – there’s very little info on how you should take GenBrain:

  • there are 60 capsules/bottle
  • a bottle is meant for a monthly use

In other words – the standard serving size is 2 pills/day.

Still, many similar supplements recommend taking more pills for best results (3-4).

However – GenBrain doesn’t give out any details on its serving size.

That’s why it’s pretty hard to tell for sure.

 


#4 – Results (1 out of 10)


I usually analyze other people’s opinions on a product – in order to see how it works.

But in GenBrain’s case, that was really hard.

That’s because I had a hard time finding any real opinions about it.

1. What People Say

Basically – GenBrain doesn’t have any authentic reviews anywhere:

  • not available on retailers like Amazon/Walmart
  • few reviews on 3rd party websites
  • all of those are promotional 

Now – there are some opinions on GenBrain’s official website.

But honestly, they look completely fake:

  • there are only 3 opinions overall
  • all of them have similar praises
  • they all have similar photos

So to be honest – I would never trust the reviews there.

And other than them, there aren’t any other authentic reviews on GenBrain.

That’s what makes me believe this product might be a real scam.


Conclusion

Given the lack of its customer reviews, GenBrain is far from a trustworthy product.

As far as I’m concerned – I would even say it’s a scam:

  • no real user opinion available anywhere
  • only reviews on its official page
  • they all look extremely fake

So it’s definitely not a supplement I would recommend any soon.

If you want the best cognitive supplement I know, there’s another alternative I recommend.

 

 


#5 – Side Effects (7 out of 10)


As you can guess – there’s very little info available at this chapter.

Since GenBrain has no opinions on how it works, it’s obvious it won’t have any related to its side effects.

Now – here’s the thing:

  • nootropics don’t cause side effects very often
  • they mostly appear in very high doses

The most common side effects are:

  • insomnia
  • headaches and nausea
  • difficulty focusing

But as I said – these side effects aren’t necessarily specific for GenBrain.

In fact, this product most likely contains small doses from most ingredients.

That’s why it might be quite safe from this point of view.

But sure enough – it’s hard to tell, since there are no user reviews.

 


#6 – Price (4 out of 10)


Given what it contains, GenBrain can be considered a very expensive supplement.

That’s because its value isn’t worth its actual price.

But let me explain.

1. The Exact Price

As I said – GenBrain can only be purchased via its official website:

  1. Standard price is $49/bottle.
  2. It gets better if you buy larger quantities.
  3. In the best case, it costs around $30/bottle.

Now – $30/bottle (in the best case) sound really affordable for this kind of supplement.

But you should also consider its formula.

There are no doses and you can’t tell the exact ingredients inside it.

So most likely – its composition is very weak overall.

That’s why this kind of formula is definitely not worth $49, not even $30.

So I would surely not recommend it.

2. Competitors’ Price

I will only compare GenBrain with my #1 recommended nootropic.

I’m talking about a supplement called MindMD:

  1. MindMD has one of the best formulas from the market.
  2. On the other hand, GenBrain has a real problem at this chapter.
  3. MindMD’s standard price is $50/bottle.
  4. In the best case, it costs around $46.
  5. GenBrain costs $50 as well (as a standard price).
  6. However, it offers a larger discount for a larger supply ($30/bottle).

Now – GenBrain does seem to have a much better price overall.

But given its very weak formula, I would say it’s not worth it at all.

On the other hand, MindMD has a much better quality/price.

So even though its lowest price is higher, this product is a lot more worth it.

That’s why it’s my top recommended nootropic.


Conclusion

GenBrain is way too expensive for its actual quality and value.

Considering that it might be a scam – it’s surely not worth all these money.

That’s why it’s not a product I would recommend any soon.

If you want something that really works, I have a much better alternative below.

 

 


#7 – Availability (3 out of 10)


Like many supplements of this kind – GenBrain is only available on its official website.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing.

But given that its website doesn’t look very safe, you might want to consider purchasing it:

  • price is not available on the home page
  • you have to fill in your data first
  • you can only see the cost afterwards

That’s a pretty classic strategy that some brands use.

And it’s usually because they save the customer’s email and street address.

If he doesn’t buy the product straight away, he keeps receiving emails in the next weeks.

So in the end, the potential buyer ends up purchasing the product.

I personally don’t agree with this strategy, even though there’s nothing wrong with it.

But if you ask me – you should be told the exact price from the start.

That would be fair, at least.

 


#8 – Final Conclusions


Here’s how I would sum up my opinion on GenBrain in 3 ideas.

1. Hidden Formula

That’s probably the biggest problem of GenBrain. 

Since formula is the main aspect of any supplement – that’s a crucial issue:

  • no full ingredient list is disclosed
  • only 4 ingredients are mentioned
  • none of them has any doses

As I already said – this usually happens because the composition itself is very weak.

So that’s a serious reason to watch out.

2. Very Few Info

Besides its hidden formula – GenBrain also hides lots of things about it.

In fact, it only gives out very few aspects:

  • no details about the producer
  • it doesn’t even tell what company made it
  • its full label isn’t available anywhere

Just as I said – secrecy is usually a bad thing in supplements.

And this leads us to the next conclusion.

3. Most Likely A Scam

Given the facts I noticed about it, GenBrain has all chances to be a rip-off.

There are just too many things that don’t seem right about it.

Not to mention that its lack of real opinions is another question sign.

So it’s surely not a product I would trust.

 


My Verdict – Worth Or Not?


Short answer: Surely not.

As far as I’m concerned – I would say it’s a scam:

  1. Hidden producer and formula.
  2. No doses for any ingredient.
  3. Lacks essential info about its composition/dosage.
  4. Absolutely no real customer opinion.
  5. Very expensive for its real value.

Now – there might be some people who had positive results with it, no doubt.

But compared to other products, I would say this per cent is much lower.

So there’s no way I could recommend GenBrain, given all the problems it has.

But what do I recommend instead?

Well, there’s a supplement that makes my #1 recommendation among nootropics:

  • one of the best formulas from the market
  • great quality/price ratio
  • effective for several issues

So if there’s an alternative I would recommend to GenBrain, it would surely be this one.

best cognitive

References:

1 – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/-books/NBK114917/

2 – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/-pmc/articles/PMC4160700/

3 – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/-pmc/articles/PMC3166615/

Written by 

Olly is a registered pharmacist with a long experience in health field. She graduated from University of Medicine and Pharmacy and has studies in Cosmetology, Dermatology, Toxicology. She has a 2 years experience as a retail pharmacist. You can connect with her via Linkedin or email.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *